North Georgia Ford Compares 2009 Ford F-150 VS 2009 Toyota Tundra Near Calhoun, GA

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2009 Ford F-150

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VS

2009 Toyota Tundra

Safety Comparison

The F-150’s optional blind spot mirrors use wide-angle convex mirrors mounted in the corner of each side view mirror to reveal objects that may be in the driver's blind spots. The Tundra doesn’t offer a system to reveal objects in the driver's blind spots.

Both the F-150 and the Tundra have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, height adjustable front shoulder belts, four wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding and available four wheel drive.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Ford F-150 6.5 ft. bed Regular Cab is safer than the Tundra Regular Cab:

F-150

Tundra

Driver

STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

Chest forces

36 g’s

47 g’s

Leg injuries (L/R)

87 / 150

837 / 629

Passenger

STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

Head Injury Index

433

486

Chest forces

34 g’s

46 g’s

Leg injuries (L/R)

540 / 262

653 / 385

More stars indicate a better overall result. Lower numbers indicate better individual test results.

The NHTSA 35 MPH front crash test results indicate that the Ford F-150 6.5 ft. bed SuperCab is safer than the Tundra Double Cab:

F-150

Tundra

Driver

STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

Chest forces

36 g’s

47 g’s

Leg injuries (L/R)

87 / 150

837 / 629

Passenger

STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

Head Injury Index

433

486

Chest forces

34 g’s

46 g’s

Leg injuries (L/R)

540 / 262

653 / 385

More stars indicate a better overall result. Lower numbers indicate better individual test results.

For its top level performance in frontal, side and rear impact tests, and its standard AdvanceTrac™, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety rates the F-150 SuperCrew as a “Top Pick” a rating only granted to 64 vehicles tested by the IIHS. The Tundra was not a Top Pick.

Warranty Comparison

The F-150 comes with free roadside assistance for 5 years 60,000 miles. Ford will send help if you run out of gas, need a jump start, lock your keys in or need any assistance on the road. Toyota doesn’t give free roadside assistance for the Tundra.

There are over 3 times as many Ford dealers as there are Toyota dealers, which makes it much easier to get service under the F-150’s warranty.

Reliability Comparison

The Ford F-150’s engines use a cast iron block for durability, while the Tundra’s 4.0 DOHC V6 and 5.7 DOHC V8 engine uses an aluminum block. Aluminum engine blocks are much more prone to warp and crack at high temperatures than cast iron.

The engines in the F-150 have a single overhead cam for simplicity. The engines in the Tundra have dual overhead cams, which add to the number of moving parts and the complexity of the cylinder heads.

The F-150 has a standard “limp home system” to keep drivers from being stranded if most or all of the engine’s coolant is lost. The engine will run on only half of its cylinders at a time, reduce its power and light a warning lamp on the dashboard so the driver can get to a service station for repairs. The Tundra doesn’t offer a lost coolant limp home mode, so a coolant leak could strand you or seriously damage the truck’s engine.

Fuel Economy and Range Comparison

On the EPA test cycle the F-150 gets better fuel mileage than the Tundra:

F-150

Tundra

4x2

V6/5-spd Auto

n/a

15 city/19 hwy

4.6 SOHC 24 valve V8/Auto

15 city/20 hwy

14 city/18 hwy

5.7 V8

5.4 V8/Auto

14 city/20 hwy

14 city/17 hwy

4.7 V8

4.6 SOHC 16 valve V8/Auto

14 city/19 hwy

n/a

4x4

4.6 SOHC 24 valve V8/Auto

14 city/19 hwy

13 city/17 hwy

5.7 V8

4.6 SOHC 16 valve V8/Auto

14 city/18 hwy

13 city/16 hwy

4.7 V8

5.4 V8/Auto

14 city/18 hwy

n/a

To lower fuel costs and make buying fuel easier, the Ford F-150 uses regular unleaded gasoline. The Tundra with the 4.0 V6 engine requires premium for maximum efficiency, which can cost 25 to 50 cents more per gallon.

The F-150’s optional fuel tank has 9.6 gallons more fuel capacity than the Tundra (36 vs. 26.4 gallons).

The F-150 has a standard capless fueling system. The fuel filler is automatically opened when the fuel nozzle is inserted and automatically closed when it’s removed. This eliminates the need to unscrew and replace the cap and it reduces fuel evaporation which causes pollution. The Tundra doesn’t offer a capless fueling system.

Brakes and Stopping Comparison

The F-150 stops much shorter than the Tundra:

F-150

Tundra

70 to 0 MPH

196 feet

197 feet

Car and Driver

60 to 0 MPH

133 feet

145 feet

Motor Trend

Tires and Wheels Comparison

The Ford F-150’s wheels have 6 lugs for longer wheel bearing life, less chance of rotor warping and greater strength. The Toyota Tundra only has 5 wheel lugs per wheel.

Suspension and Handling Comparison

The F-150’s front to rear weight distribution is more even (56.1% to 43.9%) than the Tundra’s (57.8% to 42.2%). This gives the F-150 more stable handling and braking.

The F-150 5.5 ft. bed King Ranch SuperCrew 4x4 handles at .73 G’s, while the Tundra Standard Bed Limited Double Cab 4x4 pulls only .67 G’s of cornering force in a Car and Driver skidpad test.

Chassis Comparison

As tested by Car and Driver while at idle, the interior of the F-150 5.5 ft. bed King Ranch SuperCrew 4x4 is quieter than the Tundra Standard Bed Limited Double Cab 4x4 (42 vs. 45 dB).

Passenger Space Comparison

The F-150 SuperCab has .8 inches more front headroom, 1 inch more rear headroom, 4 inches more rear hip room and .1 inches more rear shoulder room than the Tundra Double Cab.

The F-150 SuperCrew has .8 inches more front headroom, 1.6 inches more rear headroom, 2 inches more rear hip room and .2 inches more rear shoulder room than the Tundra CrewMax.

Cargo Capacity Comparison

The F-150’s cargo box is larger than the Tundra’s in almost every dimension:

F-150 SuperCrew

F-150 Regular Cab

Tundra CrewMax

Length (short/long)

67”/78.8”

78.8”/97.4”

66.7”

Min Width

50”

50”

50”

Height

22.4”

22.4”

22.2”

Ergonomics Comparison

The F-150 offers a remote vehicle starting system, so the vehicle can be started from inside the driver's house. This allows the driver to comfortably warm up the engine before going out to the vehicle. The Tundra doesn’t offer a remote starting system.

The F-150 (except XL/SXT/XLT)’s optional easy entry system raises the steering wheel and glides the driver’s seat back when the door is unlocked or the ignition is switched off, making it easier for the driver to get in and out. The Tundra doesn’t offer an easy entry system.

The power windows available on both the F-150 and the Tundra have locks to prevent small children from operating them. When the lock on the F-150 is engaged the driver can still operate all of the windows, for instance to close one opened by a child. The Tundra prevents the driver from operating the other windows just as it does the other passengers.

The F-150’s standard variable intermittent wipers have an adjustable delay to allow the driver to choose a setting that best clears the windshield during light rain or mist. The Tundra DX’s standard wipers have no intermittent settings at all, so the driver will have to constantly turn them on and off. The F-150 Platinum’s standard wipers adjust their speed and turn on and off automatically according to the amount of rainfall on the windshield. The Tundra SR5/Limited’s manually variable intermittent wipers have to be constantly adjusted.

The F-150’s standard power mirror controls are mounted on the door for easy access. The Tundra’s optional power mirror controls are on the dash, hidden behind the steering wheel, where they are awkward to manipulate.

The F-150 (except XL/SXT/XLT)’s optional air conditioned front seats cool the driver and front passenger and help take the sting out of hot leather in Summer. The Tundra doesn’t offer air conditioned front seats.

The F-150’s available GPS navigation system offers a real-time traffic update feature that offers alternative routes to automatically bypass traffic problems. (Service available in a limited number of metro areas.) The Tundra’s available navigation system doesn’t offer real-time traffic updates.

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