North Georgia Ford Compares 2017 Ford Fiesta VS 2017 Kia Rio Near Ellijay, GA

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2017 Ford Fiesta

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VS

2017 Kia Rio

Safety Comparison

The Fiesta’s blind spot mirrors use wide-angle convex mirrors mounted in the corner of each side view mirror to reveal objects that may be in the driver’s blind spots. The Rio doesn’t offer a system to reveal objects in the driver’s blind spots.

Compared to metal, the Fiesta’s plastic fuel tank can withstand harder, more intrusive impacts without leaking; this decreases the possibility of fire. The Kia Rio has a metal gas tank.

The Fiesta (except S) offers optional SYNC, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to get turn-by-turn driving directions or send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Rio doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies, so if you’re involved in an accident and you’re incapacitated help may not come as quickly.

Both the Fiesta and the Rio have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front-wheel drive, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding and available rearview cameras.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Ford Fiesta is safer than the Kia Rio:

 

Fiesta

Rio

 

Driver

STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

HIC

148

318

Neck Injury Risk

25%

31%

Neck Stress

246 lbs.

410 lbs.

Neck Compression

45 lbs.

75 lbs.

Leg Forces (l/r)

415/349 lbs.

572/327 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does side impact tests on new vehicles. In this test, which crashes the vehicle into a flat barrier at 38.5 MPH and into a post at 20 MPH, results indicate that the Ford Fiesta is safer than the Kia Rio:

 

Fiesta

Rio

 

Front Seat

STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

HIC

130

307

Chest Movement

1.2 inches

1.3 inches

Abdominal Force

210 G’s

327 G’s

Hip Force

413 lbs.

429 lbs.

 

Rear Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

307

324

 

Into Pole

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

Max Damage Depth

12 inches

14 inches

HIC

180

286

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

In a 31 MPH side-impact test, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety crashes a 3300 pound sled into the side of new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Ford Fiesta Sedan is safer than the Rio:

 

Fiesta

Rio

Overall Evaluation

GOOD

ACCEPTABLE

Structure

GOOD

ACCEPTABLE

 

Driver

Head Protection Rating

GOOD

GOOD

Head Injury Rating

GOOD

GOOD

Torso Injury Rating

ACCEPTABLE

MARGINAL

Head Injury Criterion

292

320

 

Rear Passenger

Head Protection Rating

GOOD

GOOD

Head Injury Rating

GOOD

GOOD

Torso Injury Rating

GOOD

GOOD

Pelvis/Leg Injury Rating

GOOD

GOOD

Warranty Comparison

The Fiesta’s 5-year corrosion warranty has no mileage limitations, but the corrosion warranty on the Rio runs out after 100,000 miles.

There are over 5 times as many Ford dealers as there are Kia dealers, which makes it much easier should you ever need service under the Fiesta’s warranty.

Reliability Comparison

To reliably start during all conditions and help handle large electrical loads, the Fiesta has a standard 500-amp battery. The Rio’s 410-amp battery isn’t as powerful.

Fuel Economy and Range Comparison

On the EPA test cycle the Fiesta SFE 3 cyl. Manual gets better fuel mileage than the Rio Manual (31 city/41 hwy vs. 27 city/36 hwy).

On the EPA test cycle the Fiesta Auto 4 cyl. gets better highway fuel mileage than the Rio Auto (27 city/37 hwy vs. 27 city/36 hwy).

The Fiesta has a gallon more fuel capacity than the Rio (12.4 vs. 11.4 gallons), for longer range between fill-ups.

The Fiesta has a standard cap-less fueling system. The fuel filler is automatically opened when the fuel nozzle is inserted and automatically closed when it’s removed. This eliminates the need to unscrew and replace the cap and it reduces fuel evaporation, which causes pollution. The Rio doesn’t offer a cap-less fueling system.

Brakes and Stopping Comparison

In an emergency stopping situation, many drivers don’t press the brakes with enough force to stop the vehicle in the shortest distance. The Fiesta has a standard brake assist system to detect emergency braking situations (by how hard and how quickly the brake pedal is pressed) and then automatically apply maximum braking immediately in order to help prevent a collision. The Rio doesn’t offer a brake assist feature.

The Fiesta stops much shorter than the Rio:

 

Fiesta

Rio

 

70 to 0 MPH

175 feet

183 feet

Car and Driver

60 to 0 MPH

116 feet

135 feet

Motor Trend

60 to 0 MPH (Wet)

147 feet

148 feet

Consumer Reports

Tires and Wheels Comparison

The Fiesta’s standard tires provide better handling because they have a lower 60 series profile (height to width ratio) that provides a stiffer sidewall than the Rio LX/EX’s standard 65 series tires.

Suspension and Handling Comparison

The Fiesta’s drift compensation steering can automatically compensate for road conditions which would cause the vehicle to drift from side to side, helping the driver to keep the vehicle straight more easily. The Rio doesn’t offer drift compensation steering.

The Fiesta’s front to rear weight distribution is more even (59.4% to 40.6%) than the Rio’s (62.2% to 37.8%). This gives the Fiesta more stable handling and braking.

The Fiesta Titanium Five-Door Hatchback handles at .81 G’s, while the Rio SX 5-Door Hatchback pulls only .79 G’s of cornering force in a Car and Driver skidpad test.

The Fiesta Titanium Five-Door Hatchback executes Motor Trend’s “Figure Eight” maneuver quicker than the Rio EX 5-Door Hatchback (28 seconds @ .58 average G’s vs. 28.6 seconds @ .57 average G’s).

Chassis Comparison

As tested by Car and Driver while under full throttle, the interior of the Fiesta Titanium Five-Door Hatchback is quieter than the Rio SX 5-Door Hatchback (75 vs. 79 dB).

Ergonomics Comparison

The Fiesta Automatic offers a remote vehicle starting system, so the vehicle can be started from inside the driver's house. This allows the driver to comfortably warm up the engine before going out to the vehicle. The Rio doesn’t offer a remote starting system.

The power windows available on both the Fiesta and the Rio have locks to prevent small children from operating them. When the lock on the Fiesta is engaged the driver can still operate all of the windows, for instance to close one opened by a child. The Rio prevents the driver from operating the other windows just as it does the other passengers.

The Fiesta’s standard power locks allow the driver or passenger to lock or unlock all the doors at a touch without leaning over, or reaching to the back seat. Power locks cost extra on the Rio.

In case you lock your keys in your vehicle, or don’t have them with you, you can let yourself in using the Fiesta’s available exterior PIN entry system. The Rio doesn’t offer an exterior PIN entry system.

Consumer Reports rated the Fiesta’s headlight performance “Good,” a higher rating than the Rio’s headlights, which were rated “Fair.”

The Fiesta (except S)’s optional automatic temperature control maintains the temperature you set, automatically controlling fan speed, vents and temperature to maintain a consistent, comfortable environment. The Rio doesn’t offer automatic air conditioning.

Bluetooth wireless connectivity is standard on the Fiesta, connecting the driver and passenger’s cell phones to the vehicle systems. This allows them to use the vehicle’s stereo and hand controls to place calls safely and easily. Bluetooth costs extra on the Rio.

Economic Advantages Comparison

Insurance will cost less for the Fiesta owner. The Complete Car Cost Guide estimates that insurance for the Fiesta will cost $550 to $1370 less than the Rio over a five-year period.

According to The Car Book by Jack Gillis, the Fiesta is less expensive to operate than the Rio because typical repairs cost less on the Fiesta than the Rio, including $99 less for fuel injection and $64 less for front struts.

Recommendations Comparison

J.D. Power and Associates rated the Fiesta third among small cars in owner reported satisfaction. This includes how well the vehicle performs and satisfies its owner’s expectations. The Rio isn’t in the top three.

The Ford Fiesta outsold the Kia Rio by 79% during the 2016 model year.

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