North Georgia Ford Compares 2017 Ford Mustang VS 2017 BMW 2 Near Surprise, AZ

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2017 Ford Mustang

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VS

2017 BMW 2

Safety Comparison

The Mustang Premium’s optional blind spot warning system uses digital cameras monitored by computer to alert the driver to moving objects in the vehicle’s blind spots where the side view mirrors don’t reveal them. The 2 Series doesn’t offer a system to reveal objects in the driver’s blind spots.

To help make backing safer, the Mustang Premium’s optional cross-path warning system uses wide-angle radar in the rear bumper to alert the driver to vehicles approaching from the side, helping the driver avoid collisions. The 2 Series doesn’t offer a cross-path warning system.

Both the Mustang and the 2 Series have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, driver and front passenger knee airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, available collision warning systems and rear parking sensors.

Warranty Comparison

Ford’s powertrain warranty covers the Mustang 1 year and 10,000 miles longer than BMW covers the 2 Series. Any repair needed on the engine, transmission, axles, joints or driveshafts is fully covered for 5 years or 60,000 miles. Coverage on the 2 Series ends after only 4 years or 50,000 miles.

There are over 11 times as many Ford dealers as there are BMW dealers, which makes it much easier should you ever need service under the Mustang’s warranty.

Reliability Comparison

The Mustang has a standard “limp home system” to keep drivers from being stranded if most or all of the engine’s coolant is lost. The engine will run on only half of its cylinders at a time, reduce its power and light a warning lamp on the dashboard so the driver can get to a service station for repairs. The 2 Series doesn’t offer a lost coolant limp home mode, so a coolant leak could strand you or seriously damage the car’s engine.

Engine Comparison

The Mustang has more powerful engines than the 2 Series:

 

Horsepower

Torque

Mustang 3.7 DOHC V6

300 HP

280 lbs.-ft.

Mustang ECOBoost 2.3 turbo 4 cyl.

310 HP

320 lbs.-ft.

Mustang GT 5.0 DOHC V8

435 HP

400 lbs.-ft.

230i 2.0 turbo 4 cyl.

248 HP

258 lbs.-ft.

M240i 3.0 turbo 6 cyl.

335 HP

369 lbs.-ft.

Fuel Economy and Range Comparison

To lower fuel costs and make buying fuel easier, the Ford Mustang uses regular unleaded gasoline (premium recommended on Mustang ECOBoost for maximum performance). The 2 Series requires premium, which can cost 20 to 55 cents more per gallon.

The Mustang ECOBoost’s standard fuel tank has 1.8 gallons more fuel capacity than the 2 Series (15.5 vs. 13.7 gallons), for longer range between fill-ups. The Mustang V6/GT’s standard fuel tank has 2.3 gallons more fuel capacity than the 2 Series (16 vs. 13.7 gallons).

The Mustang has a standard cap-less fueling system. The fuel filler is automatically opened when the fuel nozzle is inserted and automatically closed when it’s removed. This eliminates the need to unscrew and replace the cap and it reduces fuel evaporation, which causes pollution. The 2 Series doesn’t offer a cap-less fueling system.

Brakes and Stopping Comparison

For better stopping power the Mustang’s brake rotors are larger than those on the 2 Series:

 

Mustang

Mustang GT

228i

2 Series

Front Rotors

12.5 inches

15 inches

12.3 inches

13.4 inches

Rear Rotors

12.5 inches

13 inches

11.4 inches

13.6 inches

The Mustang stops much shorter than the 2 Series:

 

Mustang

2 Series

 

80 to 0 MPH

201 feet

209 feet

Road and Track

60 to 0 MPH

112 feet

125 feet

Road and Track

Tires and Wheels Comparison

For better traction, the Mustang has larger standard tires than the 2 Series (235/55R17 vs. 205/50R17). The Mustang’s optional tires are larger than the largest tires available on the 2 Series (265/35R20 vs. 225/40R18).

The Mustang’s optional tires provide better handling because they have a lower 35 series profile (height to width ratio) that provides a stiffer sidewall than the 2 Series’ optional 40 series front tires.

For better ride, handling and brake cooling the Mustang offers optional 20-inch wheels. The 2 Series’ largest wheels are only 18-inches.

The Mustang offers an optional space-saver spare tire so you can replace a flat tire and drive to have the flat repaired or replaced. A spare tire isn’t available on the 2 Series, it requires you to depend on its run-flat tires, which limits mileage and speed before they are repaired. If a run-flat is damaged beyond repair by a road hazard your vehicle will have to be towed.

Suspension and Handling Comparison

The Mustang has standard front and rear stabilizer bars, which help keep the Mustang flat and controlled during cornering. The 2 Series’ suspension doesn’t offer a rear stabilizer bar.

The Mustang’s drift compensation steering can automatically compensate for road conditions which would cause the vehicle to drift from side to side, helping the driver to keep the vehicle straight more easily. The 2 Series doesn’t offer drift compensation steering.

For a smoother ride and more stable handling, the Mustang’s wheelbase is 1.2 inches longer than on the 2 Series (107.1 inches vs. 105.9 inches).

For better handling and stability, the track (width between the wheels) on the Mustang is 2.5 inches wider in the front and 3.8 inches wider in the rear than on the 2 Series.

The Mustang EcoBoost Fastback handles at .96 G’s, while the 230i Coupe pulls only .89 G’s of cornering force in a Motor Trend skidpad test.

The Mustang EcoBoost Fastback executes Motor Trend’s “Figure Eight” maneuver 1.4 seconds quicker than the 230i Coupe (24.2 seconds @ .79 average G’s vs. 25.6 seconds @ .77 average G’s).

Chassis Comparison

The Mustang ECOBoost uses computer-generated active noise cancellation to help remove annoying noise and vibration from the passenger compartment, especially at low frequencies. The 2 Series doesn’t offer active noise cancellation.

Passenger Space Comparison

The Mustang Fastback has 3 inches more front legroom and 1.9 inches more front shoulder room than the 2 Series Coupe.

The Mustang Convertible has 3 inches more front legroom, 1.9 inches more front shoulder room and 2.5 inches more rear shoulder room than the 2 Series Convertible.

Cargo Capacity Comparison

The Mustang Fastback’s standard folding rear seats are split to accommodate bulky cargo. The 2 Series Convertible’s standard single piece folding rear seat is not as flexible; long cargo and a passenger can’t share the rear seat.

Ergonomics Comparison

The Mustang Auto has a standard remote vehicle starting system, so the vehicle can be started from inside the driver's house. This allows the driver to comfortably warm up the engine before going out to the vehicle. The 2 Series doesn’t offer a remote starting system.

The Mustang Premium’s optional easy entry system glides the driver’s seat back when the door is unlocked or the ignition is switched off, making it easier for the driver to get in and out. The 2 Series doesn’t offer an easy entry system.

The Mustang’s instruments include an oil pressure gauge and a temperature gauge – which could save your engine! Often ‘idiot lights’ don’t warn you until damage has been done. The 2 Series has neither an oil pressure gauge nor a temperature gauge.

To shield the driver and front passenger’s vision over a larger portion of the windshield and side windows, the Mustang has standard extendable sun visors. The 2 Series doesn’t offer extendable visors.

Standard air conditioned seats in the Mustang Premium keep the driver and front passenger comfortable and take the sting out of hot seats in Summer. The 2 Series doesn’t offer air conditioned seats.

To keep a safe, consistent following distance, the Mustang Premium offers an optional Adaptive Cruise Contr4ol, which alters the speed of the vehicle without driver intervention. This allows the driver to use cruise control more safely without constantly having to disengage it when approaching slower traffic. The 2 Series doesn’t offer an adaptive cruise control.

Economic Advantages Comparison

The Mustang will cost the buyer less in the long run because of its superior resale value. The IntelliChoice estimates that the Mustang will retain 47.07% to 58.17% of its original price after five years, while the 2 Series only retains 40.11% to 47.48%.

According to The Car Book by Jack Gillis, the Mustang is less expensive to operate than the 2 Series because it costs $396 less to do the manufacturer’s suggested maintenance for 50,000 miles. Typical repairs cost much less on the Mustang than the 2 Series, including $477 less for a water pump, $418 less for an alternator, $90 less for front brake pads, $410 less for a starter, $228 less for fuel injection, $74 less for a fuel pump, $194 less for front struts, $446 less for a timing belt/chain and $425 less for a power steering pump.

IntelliChoice estimates that five-year ownership costs (depreciation, financing, insurance, fuel, fees, repairs and maintenance) for the Ford Mustang will be $1934 to $7222 less than for the BMW 2 Series.

Recommendations Comparison

IntelliChoice recognized the Ford Mustang as a “Best Value of the Year” for the 2015 model year.

The Ford Mustang outsold the BMW 2 Series by almost seven to one during the 2016 model year.

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